• Short Summary

    A leading Israeli electronics firm has unveiled two sophisticated reconnaisance systems, one of which it claims to be unique and can trace the exact location of enemy missiles bases.

  • Description

    1.
    GV & SVs Remotely piloted automatic plane (R.P.V.) (3 shots)
    0.13

    2.
    SV Men checking control panel and starting plane (4 shots)
    0.30

    3.
    GV PAN Plane takes off
    0.48

    4.
    SV Men at monitoring equipment
    0.50

    5.
    GV Plane flying
    0.54

    6.
    SV Man at controls
    0.56

    7.
    GV Plane in air
    1.01

    8.
    CU Monitor screen showing pictures from camera on aircraft
    1.07

    9.
    GV Aircraft still flying
    1.12


    The Radar analysis system (R.A.S.) was developed after a study of war techniques employed during the 1973 October War, according to Tadiran engineers. They said the R.S.A. can pick up hundreds of radar beams simultaneously at a range of 120 degrees and an attached computer instantly analyses each beam. They said it could spot the exact location of a missile battery, and give an immediate identification of the missile and the way its homing system works. The main purpose of the R.A.S. is to give combat pilot flying over enemy territory a complete map of missile batteries he is up against, the engineers said.




    Initials BB/1620



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A leading Israeli electronics firm has unveiled two sophisticated reconnaisance systems, one of which it claims to be unique and can trace the exact location of enemy missiles bases. On Monday (29 May) Tadiran, the biggest electronic concern in Israel, showed reporters its Radar Analysis System and a mini piloted vehicle in northern Israel.

    SYNOPSIS: The mini-remotely piloted vehicle system (R.P.V.) consists of six small planes, a central control system and a video tape and screen. Each plane has a 4.2 metre (13 feet, 8 inches) wingspan an weighs 70 kilograms (150 pounds).

    The plane or "bird" as the Tadiran Electronics Company calls it, is directed by a sophisticated radio control system on the ground. The whole R.P.V. system cost half a million dollars to built which is reported to be a quarter of the price for similar systems from the United States. The demonstrations went without hitches. The bird, which can fly at a maximum altitude of 10,000 feet (3,200 metres) and at a speed of 150 kilometres per hour (95 m.p.h.) for up to six hours, had a perfect inaugural flight.

    The plane can carry 15 kilograms (32 pounds) of reconnaisance equipment and a camera mounted to the craft gives a constant view of the flight route on a television screen. A video recording can be replayed for intelligence purposes. The Tadiran company says it has already sold many R.P.V. systems to "developed countries" which it would not identify.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB4VMDIDX01P0SG1CUATPKA5AD
    Media URN:
    VLVAB4VMDIDX01P0SG1CUATPKA5AD
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/05/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment