• Short Summary

    Australia's third largest city -- Brisbane -- is still reeling under the effects of its severest floods in living memory.

  • Description

    1.
    Tracking shot through floodwaters in Brisbane centre
    0.10

    2.
    SV Girl stranded in doorway
    0.15

    3.
    Tracking shot from boats showing three women on hotel canopy, boat turns showing flooded intersection
    0.38

    4.
    SV Man paddles boat through floodwater
    0.45

    5.
    Tracking shot through water showing flooded motel
    0.53

    6.
    Tracking shot past flooded car up to roof with water
    1.03

    7.
    People waiting on hillside road
    1.10

    8.
    Tracking shot boat under shop canopies
    1.23

    9.
    CU Elderly people carried to boats by police (2 shots)
    1.44

    10.
    TV Rescue boat leaving
    1.49

    11.
    LV Traffic jam
    1.55

    12.
    GV PAN Car through floodwater to man picking live fish from floodwaters
    2.05



    Initials SC/BB/0007



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Australia's third largest city -- Brisbane -- is still reeling under the effects of its severest floods in living memory.

    As the swollen Brisbane River continued to recede on Wednesday (30 January) police discovered the bodies of four more men, bringing the death toll to 13 dead and three missing.

    Estimates of the damage are still vague, but range upwards from 200 million dollars (about 130 million sterling).

    The battered city of 800,000 faced an increasing disease hazard from tons of untreated sewerage, foul water and mud. A massive clean-up involving hundreds of thousands of men and trucks from the City Council, the Queensland government and the Army began on Wednesday. But further rain showers hampered efforts by householders to dry their soaked possessions.

    About 9,000 people were evacuated from their homes during the floods -- men and women wept openly as they returned to their devastated homes.

    In the shops, prices have soared as panic buying emptied the shelves. Meat, vegetables, fruit and most food lines were scarce. The food shortage was expected to ease as road and rail links with southern states began to re-open.

    Hundreds of flood victims applied for government aid and cheques ranging from 500 dollars (344 sterling) to 1000 dollars (689 sterling) were handed out.

    Looting became a problem, and during the night, groups armed with rifles and shotguns stood guard at shops and homes. Police said there had been cases of looters posing as rescue workers and loading up boats with the contents of deserted homes and shops.

    The city was in chaos on Tuesday as people tried to reach the centre to report for duty on the first working day after the Australia Day long weekend. Some used boats to travel up still-flooded streets to reach their offices.

    The Brisbane River was expected to fall below flood level on Thursday (31 January) for the first time in six days.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABDSCU5EKUI32RO2VSDI9L0IL9
    Media URN:
    VLVABDSCU5EKUI32RO2VSDI9L0IL9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/01/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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