• Short Summary

    Polish industry has been hit by a lack of Western credit, following the imposition of martial law in the country last December.

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXT Factories in Lodz. (2 SHOTS)
    0.19

    2.
    GV ZOOM TO SV INT Workman testing texture of cotton after it has been dipped in solution. (2 SHOTS)
    0.34

    3.
    SV PAN Woman loading onto loom.
    0.38

    4.
    GVs Production halls. (2 SHOTS)
    0.51

    5.
    SV TILT UP Old fashioned weaving loom in operation.
    0.54

    6.
    SV Export sign PAN DOWN TO machine.
    1.02

    7.
    SVs Woman operating loom. (3 SHOTS)
    1.22

    8.
    SV Loom in operation.
    1.28

    9.
    SV PAN Woven cloth coming out of loom. (2 SHOTS)
    1.42

    10.
    CU Export sign PAN TO loom in operation.
    1.52

    11.
    GV Women operating looms. (2 SHOTS)
    2.10




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Polish industry has been hit by a lack of Western credit, following the imposition of martial law in the country last December. Poland can no longer afford to import raw materials and spare parts for Western-made machinery and equipment. In a bid to offset the consequences of Western credit restrictions, the Soviet Union has agreed to provide raw materials, equipment and hard currency to be used in the production of goods. In the central Polish city of Lodz, textile workers now process yarn imported from the Soviet Union. But workers claim that output suffers from the generally inferior quality of the raw material. They also say that production is impaired by the lack of spare parts for the now old-fashioned machinery imported in the past from Western countries such as Britain. According to Polish manufacturers, those textiles products reserved for the home market fetch inflated prices because the main bulk of the output is destined for the Soviet market. Poland exports mainly manufactured goods to the Soviet Union. However, it imports mostly raw materials and fuels, which have been steadily rising in price. The Soviet Union used to supply cheap oil to its Eastern European allies. But now it is adjusting its oil prices to the higher, world market levels, with a consequent threat to industrial costs.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABVEMLE49WDLCZAQCRAGO4ZN1L
    Media URN:
    VLVABVEMLE49WDLCZAQCRAGO4ZN1L
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/05/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:09:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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