• Short Summary

    Many of Japan's colourful festivals date from medieval times.

  • Description

    1.
    AERIAL VIEW Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan
    0.06

    2.
    AERIAL VIEW Tokushima streets with festival in progress
    0.14

    3.
    SV People dressed as "Tanuki", a raccoon dog looking like panda
    0.21

    4.
    SV Japanese girls in silver and gold brief costumes marching along street
    0.29

    5.
    SV "Tanuki" shaking hands with motorist as clown rides on bicycle waving to crowds
    0.35

    6.
    SVs Japanese children in scout uniform and other costumes in parade (3 shots)
    0.46

    7.
    SV Japanese bearers carry giant model of "Tanuki" as crowds watch (2 shots)
    1.05

    8.
    GV Dancers
    1.10

    9.
    SV Person in Tanuki costume shaking hands with children
    1.15

    10.
    SV Live Tanuki crossing over ladder as children watch (2 shots)
    1.23

    11.
    CU PULL BACK TO GV Life-size Tanuki painted on boards with children putting their faces through the head holes (2 shots)
    1.33

    12.
    AERIAL VIEW AND LS Tokyo
    1.42

    13.
    SV Japanese men standing on heads on logs in Sumida River as crowds look on (2 shots)
    1.49

    14.
    SV Man walking on log with umbrella and falling in
    2.00

    15.
    SV Men preparing for log rolling display and then walking on logs over water carrying man in cradle who falls in water and crowd laugh (3 shots)
    2.11

    16.
    SV AND GV Six men log rolling and falling into water
    2.19

    17.
    SV AND GVs Man lies on ground with men balancing on top of him with bales of rice (4 shots)
    2.35




    Initials SW





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Many of Japan's colourful festivals date from medieval times. Recent annual events have included tests of strength with bales of rice, log-rolling, acrobatic stunts and street celebrations with singing, dancing and parades of colourful floats.

    SYNOPSIS: Tokushima City, on Japan's fourth largest island of Shikoku, is famous for its summertime "Awa-Odori" festival--one of the country's most ancient celebrations. But now it has started a new autumn - winter festival and the theme each year is the "Tanuki". This is Japan's lovable raccoon dog which looks rather like a tiny brown panda with black eyes.

    It was only the third year of the festival, but it's already a firm favourite. Nearly half a million people joined in the fun. The Tanuki was chosen as the theme to celebrate the bond existing between humans and animals. In Japanese legend, the Tanuki is depicted as the cunning and resourceful hero. He'd described as being bale to talk to humans in their own language.

    The Tanuki is often shown as an amusing rogue, often the worse for wear after over indulging in too much rice wine. But the children love him--the Tanuki is their favourite pet. The "Furusato", which means home-town festival, is enjoyed by revellers from all over Japan.

    Another colourful event is the ancient art of log-rolling, and acrobatic stunts like this. Wood-workers compete against each other every year along the Sumida River in Tokyo. The main qualities needed are balance and agility. The festival has taken place in this Tokyo timber processing district for 300 years.

    For their displays of log-rolling the competitors wear wooden clogs with very high platforms. And falling in the water will always amuse the festive crowds.

    Not very far away, rice dealers take part in a strength contest. The highlight comes when a champion has friends standing on his stomach carrying bales of rice. He supports 1,000 kilograms (about 2,200 pounds) in a superb display of muscle control.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAC07FA4RVJW4LQKCR190128JSV
    Media URN:
    VLVAC07FA4RVJW4LQKCR190128JSV
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/11/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment