• Short Summary

    The Chilean Government has agreed in principle to give the land-locked country of Bolivia access to the Pacific Ocean.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Andes Mountains
    0.03

    2.
    GV PAN AND TOP GV La Paz city in valley surrounded by mountains. (2 shots)
    0.17

    3.
    CU Woman in traditional Chilean dress.
    0.21

    4.
    AERIAL VIEW Coastline.
    0.38

    5.
    LV AND CU Border post between Bolivia and Chile. (4 shots)
    0.56

    6.
    LV AND SV Shanty town on roadside leading to Africa.
    1.03

    7.
    AERIAL VIEW Arica Port.
    1.07

    8.
    GV Large vessel in port.
    1.10

    9.
    GV Port installations.
    1.14

    10.
    SV Motor launch in harbour.
    1.15



    Initials VS 18.10 VS 18.20



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Chilean Government has agreed in principle to give the land-locked country of Bolivia access to the Pacific Ocean.

    No details have yet been made know, but it's believed the Bolivians have been offered a corridor running south of the Chile-Peru frontier, from Charana on the Chile-Bolivia border, to a point on the Pacific, just north of the Chilean town of Arica.

    But the proposal must be agreed to by the Peruvian Government which has residual rights over the territory.

    Au outlet to the sea has been a Bolivian aspiration since the 1879 war of the Pacific when she lost the Pacific province of Antofagasta and part of Tarpaca to the conquering Chilean army.

    In that war, Bolivia's ally, Peru, also lost to Chile a sizeable portion of the province of Tarapaca, including the town of Arica.

    Under the terms of the treaty of Ancon, signed between Chile and Peru in 1929. both countries agreed not to cede disputed territories to third parties without prior consultation and mutual agreement.

    In February last year the Presidents of Chile and Bolivia met and agreed to re-establish diplomatic relations, broken off in 1962, and to discuss Bolivia's claim to a Pacific port.

    There are some snags to the Chilean offer. Chile wants some Bolivian territory in compensation....and it's thought that it wants land on the Cordillera de Lipez, an area in the south-west of Bolivia which is rich in mineral.

    Chile is also insisting that the corridor should be demilitarized. This is designed to ensure Chile maintains her naval superiority in that part of the Southern Pacific.

    SYNOPSIS: The Andes Mountains which border the land-locked Bolivia. An outlet to the sea has been a Bolivia aspiration since the 1879 war of the Pacific when she lost the Pacific province of Antofagasta and part of Tarapace to the conquering Chilean army. Now, Chile has put forward a proposal which may give her the outlet.

    No details have been made known, but it's thought Bolivia has been offered a corridor running south of the border of Chile and Peru, from Charana on the border between Chile and Bolivia to a point just north of the Chilean town of Arica.

    But there are some snags to the offer. Chile wants some Bolivian territory in compensation...probably land on the Cordillera de Lipez. That's in south-west Bolivia and the land is rich in minerals. Chile is also insisting that the land she's giving up should be demilitarized, apparently so she can retain her naval superiority in that part of the Southern Pacific. She has also set several other conditions.

    Because of an agreement made in 1929, Chile must also get Peru's agreement before she can hand the land over to Bolivia.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACELB387CWWYQYEY2E7BUOO4HB
    Media URN:
    VLVACELB387CWWYQYEY2E7BUOO4HB
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/01/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:16:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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