• Short Summary

    With the launching of the first of two communications satellites at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on April the 8th, India became only the second Third World nation to have use of a permanent domestic communications satellite.

  • Description

    1.
    SV Scientists at Space Application Centre Application Centre, Ahmedabad, studying monitors (6 shots)
    0.24

    2.
    CU "Apple" satellite model (2 shots)
    0.32

    3.
    SV & CU Technicians working on components (3 shots)
    0.43

    4.
    SV & GV Satellite dishes (3 shots)
    0.54

    5.
    GV & SV Small satellite dish mounted on van (3 shots)
    1.05

    6.
    CU Relayed pictures from experimental Indian craft called Bhaskara (2 shots)
    1.20

    7.
    SV & GV Technicians and scientists at work (2 shots)
    1.33

    8.
    CU Satellite components' diagram being made up
    1.39

    9.
    GV & CU Technicians at monitors (2 shots)
    1.47

    10.
    GV & SV Satellite dishes (3 shots)
    2.06

    11.
    SV & GV Technicians assembling rockets (4 shots)
    2.34

    12.
    GV Satellite dishes
    2.37

    13.
    SV PULL BACK TO GV Rocket wheeled to launch pad and loaded onto vehicle (4 shots)
    2.58

    14.
    GV INTERIOR Control room; countdown for launch (2 shots)
    3.04

    15.
    GV Rocket launched
    3.11




    Initials BB



    NOTE TO EDITORS: COMMENTARY BY ABC'S TREVOR WATSON IS AVAILABLE FOR USE.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: With the launching of the first of two communications satellites at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on April the 8th, India became only the second Third World nation to have use of a permanent domestic communications satellite. India, which paid 500 million dollars for US-made Instat satellites, is said to have on of the most advanced space programmes after the super powers. Scientists at the Space Application Centre at Ahmedadbad track the country's first locally-built experimental communications satellite, called Apple, which is positioned 36,000 kilometres over Indonesia. Part two of india's satellite programme is called remote earth resources sensing. It involves an experimental craft called Bhaskara, already in orbit, and sending back hundreds of satellite pictures. Although those countries who have their own rocket-launching facilities are prepared to carry Indian satellite into space, Indian scientistS are developing their own rocket launch programme.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACIMSS4GD8RBEQF7IECYEI34QC
    Media URN:
    VLVACIMSS4GD8RBEQF7IECYEI34QC
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/04/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:13:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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