• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION British sculptor Henry Moore, who has been described as the country's greatest artist this century, has left all his works to the British people.

  • Description

    1.
    LV AND SV Henry Moore's sculptures in garden of his Hertfordshire home, England. (MUSIC)
    0.13

    2.
    CU ZOOM OUT Tree seen through sculpture (MUSIC)
    0.17

    3.
    SAME SHOT AND LVS Sculptures. (ENGLISH NARRATION) (5 shots)
    0.47

    4.
    CU Moore seen through sculpture. (ENGLISH NARRATION)
    0.53

    5.
    SAME SHOT -- TRACKING ROUND -- Moore speaking to reporters.
    1.19

    6.
    SV Reporter looking at and working on sculpture. (ENGLISH NARRATION)
    1.25

    7.
    SVs INTERIOR Moore's studio with small sculptures, models and bones on display (ENGLISH NARRATION) (5 shots)
    1.54

    8.
    CU AND SVs Moore talking to reporter in studio. (3 shots)
    2.13

    9.
    SV EXTERIOR Moore talking to reporter and showing sculpture on turntable.
    2.30

    10.
    CU Moore talking
    2.54

    11.
    Moore continues talking over GVs and SVs sculptures. (2 shots)
    3.14


    TRANSCRIPT: HOGG: "For the past 35 years a small corner of the Hertfordshire countryside has been the workshop of the world's foremost sculptor. Now Henry Moore - in a gesture as grand as his sculptures - has left his Hertfordshire acres, his own collection of his works, and the money to care for them, to the nation. At a conservative estimate it's a bequest that runs into millions. Like most great artists Moore knew early on in his Yorkshire boyhood exactly what he wanted to be."



    MOORE: "My sister and I used to go to Sunday school and I remember the superintendent of the Sunday school in Castleford talking about Michael Angelo and this focused me when I got back home to look up in my father's encyclopedia Michael Angelo - and from then onwards instead of saying 'I want to be a tram driver' or 'I want to be an engine driver; I knew I wanted to be a sculptor."



    HOGG: "These monumental works have quite modest beginnings. This is Henry Moore's ideas studio. This is where he comes seeking inspiration from the strange shapes of the flint stones he picks up in the neighbouring fields. From these natural objects he creates small plaster models which are later transformed by molding and casting into full size pieces. More claims it's taken him a lifetime to learn about the way sculptures should be set into the landscape.



    MOORE: "But you see even here you can look at this and you get the sky against it, well it's much more, I think, much more impression in the top half of that sculpture than what you see in the bottom half which is against the grass. Up here you see I put my sculptures on turntable because I want to see what happens from other views. Because again, I was saying earlier, that sculpture can have an infinite number of different views -- all my sculpture really is based on the human body on the knowledge..... I think the human body, our own bodies is what we judge everything by. We know from our bodies what is a long distance we know, we measure distance by feet and arms length but one doesn't go and try to explain....they must find things in a work they must be things that people can find only after a time. If everything was obvious, as soon as we look we'd turn away because we'd know all about it."




    Initials VS 16.00


    REPORTER: JAMES HOGG

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION British sculptor Henry Moore, who has been described as the country's greatest artist this century, has left all his works to the British people. The bequest, which is worth millions of pounds (dollars) comes into effect when Mr. Moore dies, Mr. Moore, who is 78, is the seventh son of a Yorkshire miner. One of the last international tributes he received was the highest West German civilian award 'Pour le Merite'. Three years ago West German ambassador Herr Karl Gunter von Hase presented Mr. Moore with the award making flattering references to his shelter notebooks showing British people coping in 'the Blitz' and saying Mr. Moore was a symbol that 'sciences and arts outlive politics'. the British Broadcasting Corporation's (BBC's) James Hogg has produced the following report on Henry Moore and his work.....

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACO0M1HPK0BD43ZOTMONXZFDMV
    Media URN:
    VLVACO0M1HPK0BD43ZOTMONXZFDMV
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/03/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:14:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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