• Short Summary

    Scientist continue to be baffled by the workings of the learning process in animals from flatworms to elephants.

  • Description


    door and lab
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    into lab
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    cu fly and out
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    out
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    cu face
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    walks over to table.
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    cu rod into holder.
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    cu fly
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    hand down
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    cu him
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    ws he moves around table.
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    levers swing down.
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    chemical
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    fan
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    cu ace in magnify glass.
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    ecu face
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    cu fly no response.
    1.03


    ws he pumps.
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    cu pumps.
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    ms looks magnify glass.
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    him looking thru glass.
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    cu fly and water.
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    plunger
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    plunger
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    cu fly
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    ms fly
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    he sits and watches
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    Initials


    Print from WRCV of HB spot used 31 dec. K 7577
    Bill Dean NBC News Philadelphia.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Scientist continue to be baffled by the workings of the learning process in animals from flatworms to elephants.

    A more complete understanding of what goes on during learning may lead someday to artificially controlling how and what various animals learn.

    Recently, research at Philadelphia's Drexel Institute of Technology produced a breakthrough in one area of man's understanding of the learning process.

    Bill Dean reports.

    In Drexel's research laboratories, biologist Bartley Block has been observing the activities of blow flies -- a simple animal -- observing their reactions to certain conditions -- and trying to determine if the responses are a "conditioned response", (which would be a form of LEARNING) or something else.

    The response he watches is a live, hungry fly sticking out its tongue, more accurately, lowering its proboscis (pro BOS'iss) in preparation to eating. The fly, stuck to paraffin, is suspended just out of range of a tasty sugar water solution. Block has discovered that if the fly is repeatedly stimulated -- or tantalized -- he can get the fly to act instinctively -- like sticking out its tongue. He has begun to define the conditions under which a learning-type of behaviour will be evoked. He's recording responses which may be a forerunner of learning. In the first step - a chemical creating the odor of freshly mown hay is blown past the fly. The fly is not enticed by the odor.

    In other tests -- the fly gets both the odor and the taste of sugar water. The fly likes the water -- lowers its mouth to drink. But eventually ---- the fly will lower its mouth just to the odor -- something it wouldn't normally do. It had been concluded - therefore - the fly was "conditioned -- that is -- had LEARNED when to respond.

    But notice this test -- another fly -- repeatedly stimulated with sugar water - will lower its mouth when exposed FOR THE FIRST TIME to the normally unenticing odor. The scientists have concluded this is not learning....but have learned a little more about the learning-process -- however are not exactly sure what it is they have learned.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD3CUEMKHLSAQZ3UQAI6KNBMIS
    Media URN:
    VLVAD3CUEMKHLSAQZ3UQAI6KNBMIS
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/01/1965
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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