• Short Summary

    The five major Western powers have failed to persuade South Africa to abandon its December election plans for Namibia (South West Africa).

  • Description

    1.
    GV Union Buildings in Pretoria.
    0.05

    2.
    GV Officials arriving for talks.
    0.08

    3.
    GV South African Foreign Minister Pik Botha and other delegates gathering in conference room.
    0.21

    4.
    GV & SV Delegates seated at conference table.
    0.24

    5.
    GV Delegates leaving Union Buildings.
    0.26

    6.
    GV South African Prime Minister Pieter Botha and officials arriving.
    0.30

    7.
    GV Pressmen at conference.
    0.32

    8.
    CU Pieter Botha speaking.
    1.52


    BOTHA: "The South African government stated that the planned December elections must be seen as an internal process to elect leaders. The South African government will thereafter use its best efforts to persuade them seriously to consider ways and means of achieving international recognition through the good officers of the Special Representative to the Administrator General. In the implementation of this goal, the Special Representative would consult with the Administrator General on all aspects of the Secretary General's report - including the fixing of a further election date. The five foreign ministers stated, with regard to the unilateral elections in December, that they saw no way of reconciling such elections with the proposal which they put forward and which the Security Council has endorsed. Any such unilateral measure in relation to the election process will be regarded as null and void."



    Namibia is a former German colony administered by South Africa under an old League of Nations mandate. The United Nations voted to revoke in 1966, but Pretoria has refused to recognise that action. After the 19 October agreement, a spokesman for the Democratic Turnhalle Alliance (D.T.A.) said the United Nations plan for Namibia was still unacceptable. The multi-tribal DTA is the party most likely to win the December election, but it has so far refused to take part in the second election in June of July next year. The movement internationally recognised as Namibia's political voice is the South West African People's Organisation, or SWAPO. It says it will boycott the December election, but will contest the one supervised by the United Nations.




    Initials JS/0045



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The five major Western powers have failed to persuade South Africa to abandon its December election plans for Namibia (South West Africa). The Western ministers completed three days of intensive talks with members of the Pretoria government on Thursday (19 October). After the talks, both sides issued compromise statement which said the West would regard the unilateral elections in December as null and void. But the Western delegates will try to persuade the United Nations to hold a second election next year, under U.N. supervision.

    SYNOPSIS: The Union Buildings in the South African capital Pretoria, were the venue for the talks. Delegates from the five Western powers - the United States, Canada, Britain, France and West Germany -- were greeted by South Africa's Foreign Minister, Pik Botha, as they arrived on Thursday.

    South African Prime Minister peiter Botha, agreed to persuade the Namibian government - elected in December - to co-operate in later holding U.N. supervised elections next year.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD3OBGN9CFWPBDVCL1H529KYCU
    Media URN:
    VLVAD3OBGN9CFWPBDVCL1H529KYCU
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/10/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:51:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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