• Short Summary

    The Soviet Union's nuclear disarmament proposals are not a sign of weakness.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs Soviet troops training on obstacle course (6 shots)
    0.19

    2.
    SVs Target practice with machine guns (2 shots)
    0.22

    3.
    SVs & GVs Troops training under mock battle conditions (15 shots)
    0.53

    4.
    GVs Troops training to fire land based missiles (5 shots)
    1.17

    5.
    SV Troops working in operations from (9 shots)
    1.34

    6.
    GVs Soldier pushes button in operation room and missile is fired. Missile destroys target in the sky (7 shots)
    1.50

    7.
    GV Soviet aircraft taking off (3 shots)
    2.11

    8.
    AVs Navy ship at sea and helicopter taking off from ship (9 shots)
    2.48

    9.
    SV Sailor monitoring radar screen (3 shots)
    2.58

    10.
    GV Missiles being launched from ship (5 shots)
    3.13




    Initials RdeL/BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Soviet Union's nuclear disarmament proposals are not a sign of weakness. That was the message from the soviet Defence Minister Dmitry Ustinov on Soviet Armed Forces Day, February 23. Marshal Ustinov said the Soviet Union has the ability to build any sort of weapon, and stressed the need for troops to be trained in the operation of complicated, modern weapons. He said the ability to hit the target with the first shot and to make the best use of the mobility, firepower or other qualities of the weaponry have become the major priorities. This year is the 65th anniversary of the establishment of the Soviet army and navy. The forces were formed to support the 1917 revolution in the Soviet union. They first went into battle on February 23, 1918, against German forces in World War One. Today all Soviet men have to serve two years in the army or three years in the navy. The most pending issue facing the Soviet army is the presence of its troops in Afghanistan. A senior Kremlin official recently said the Soviet Union was seeking a political solution which would enable the Red Army to withdraw from Afghanistan. Deputy head of the Soviet Communist Party's international department, Vadim Zagladin, said Afghanistan and Pakistan were seeking a solution which would prevent external interference and permit the withdrawal of Soviet soldiers. But he said he could not predict when this would happen because Moscow not participating in the Afghan-Pakistani negotiations.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADEDT6FQ10DLX8XZ6GTROTLWKU
    Media URN:
    VLVADEDT6FQ10DLX8XZ6GTROTLWKU
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/02/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:13:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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