• Short Summary

    Several times each year the President of the European Commission, Dr. Sicco Mansholt, flies to?

  • Description

    1.
    LV Small aircraft taxi-ing
    0.03

    2.
    GV Airport building
    0.05

    3.
    LV ZOOM INTO Aircraft
    0.10

    4.
    MV PAN Mansholt out of aircraft, into car and car away (3 shots)
    0.46

    5.
    TRACKING SHOTS Strasbourg streets (2 shots)
    0.58

    6.
    TRACKING SHOTS UP TO House of Europe (2 shots)
    1.12

    7.
    SV Flags flying
    1.15

    8.
    SV & CU Sign
    1.20

    9.
    GV & SV Delegates in debating chamber (4 shots)
    1.47

    10.
    cu 7 sv Mansholt in chamber (3 shots)
    1.57

    11.
    SV Cameraman ZOOM BACK TO chamber
    2.10

    12.
    CU Mansholt speaks
    2.43


    SOUND IN: "Well, Parliament needs..."



    SOUND OUT: "...in doing so."



    MANSHOLT ARRIVING IN PRIVATE AIRCRAFT: TRACKING SHOTS THROUGH STREETS OF STRASBOURG: SHOTS OF PARLIAMENT IN SESSION: MANSHOLT ANSWERING QUESTION.



    KYLE: "Planes to Strasbourg are few and far between. But one man attaches great importance to his visits here. He is Dr. Sicco Mansholt. And at 63, he's the President of the European Commission. A farmer before the war, and a resistance leader during it, he emerged at its end as a dynamic, young Minister of Agriculture to restore Dutch farming. In 1968 he moved into the wider community stage. Mansholt was the guiding intelligence, first in the formation and later in the major attempted reforms of the common agricultural policy until, in March this year, he stepped into the Presidency to fill an unexpected vacancy.



    "Strasbourg is a remote provincial town. It failed to live up to its ambition to become a continental power centre. Yet Mansholt, like previous Commission Presidents attaches great importance to coming here six or seven times a year for the Parliamentary session in Strasbourg's House of Europe.



    "The European Parliament, with few powers except those of debate, is the weakest part of the community system. But Mansholt considers that the Commission and Parliament should help vote for each other on the effort to balance the powers of the state acting through the Council of Ministers. Inside the debating chamber of the European parliament--a semi-circle in the continental fashion rather than the opposing benches of Westminster--the members sit in party groups, not according to their nationalities. Emphasising Mansholt's statement that he's in politics, members of the European Commission have their benches on the floor of the house and regularly take part in the debate...PAUSE...And...the House of Commons, television cameras have always been allowed onto the floor of this Parliament. That's a sign, perhaps, of the European MPs feeling the need of finding a public to play to."



    MANSHOLT: "Well, ah, Parliament needs more power. When we want to be in a future community where democracy is, ah, one of the elements in political development. The parliament should have legal powers. It doesn't have it at this very moment. I should have much more control over executives on the Council as well as the Commission. It's already a long time, we are asking this, but up to now the governments--especially the French government-- were hesitating in doing so."



    Arriving at Strasboung airport in France is Dr. Sicco Mansholt. At 63, he is the President of the European Commission. Formerly the Dutch Minister of Agriculture, Dr. Mansholt shifted into the politics of the European Economic Community in 1968. He was the main force behind the attempted reforms of the community's agricultural policy. In March of this year, he took over as President of the European Commission.



    Strasbourg is a provincial town, rather than a continental power centre. Yet Mansholt, like his previous Presidents goes there several times a year for sessions of the European Parliament at Strasbourg's House of Europe. The Parliament, with few powers except those of debate, is the weakest part of the community system. But Mansholt feels that the Commission and parliament help counter the forces of the State held by the Council of Ministers.



    Inside the debating chamber, the European Parliament sits in a semicircle. Emphasising Mansholt's statement that he is in polities, members of the Commission sit in party groups, not according to their nationalities.



    Television cameras have always been allowed onto the floor. But what the Parliament really needs, says Mansholt, is not so much publicity as more power.




    Initials BB/2240 RM/BCB/BB/2300



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Several times each year the President of the European Commission, Dr. Sicco Mansholt, flies to Strasbourg, France, for the parliamentary sessions of the European Parliament.

    Dr. Mansholt, a Dutch politician, feels that the Parliament must have more political power if it is to function properly in the European community of the future.

    This report, on one of Dr. Mansholt's visits to the Rouse of Europe in Strasbourg, was filmed by the British Broadcasting Corporation. Reporter Keith Kyle's original commentary is transcribed below. An alternative commentary prepared by Visnews appears overleap.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADGG2IPTGG072QH7068XB2DVYH
    Media URN:
    VLVADGG2IPTGG072QH7068XB2DVYH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/07/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:45:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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