• Short Summary

    In West Germany, space scientists have been busy building cheap rockets in a project they describe as "creating a simple truck for space".

  • Description

    1.
    GV & SV Lampoldhausen, West Germany - Rocket cone hoisted and technicians fitting same (2 shots)
    0.08

    2.
    CU Technician looks on
    0.11

    3.
    TGV Rocket
    0.18

    4.
    SV & CU Rocket part being drilled (2 shots)
    0.21

    5.
    GV Fuel tanks
    0.24

    6.
    CU Ball valve
    0.29

    7.
    CU Ball valve motor
    0.32

    8.
    SCU Rocket fuel from nozzle
    0.40

    9.
    GV ZOOM IN ON Base of gantry with rocket
    0.48

    10.
    GV Rocket burner
    0.51

    11.
    SV Technicians preparing for static test
    0.54

    12.
    SV Fuel man at work is protective gear
    1.00

    13.
    GV Gantry with rocket ready for firing
    1.02

    14.
    CU & SV Technician looking through bunker
    1.10

    15.
    CU Technician counting down at control console (3 shots)
    1.20

    16.
    CU & GV Rocket firing (2 shots)
    1.26


    DANCY: "For the first time since the V-Two rockets of World War Two, the Germans are preparing to get back in the rocket business in a big way. At Lampoldhausen, in Southern Germany a private company called Otrag is static-firing a new rocket, designed to put satellites into earth orbit cheaply. The Germans started out to build their rocket as inexpensively as possible. The fuel tanks for example are just part of a pipeline. The ball valves used for mixing the fuel are from the chemical industry and the motor that activates them is from the windshield wiper of a truck. The fuel itself is a mixture of nitric acid and diesel oil -- at one twentieth the cost of more conventional rocket fuels. The company plans to use clusters of small rockets like these, as many as 600 of them, in the booster. Each of these small rockets develops three tons of thrust, but grouped together they could put up to ten tons in orbit. The German rocket will cost about GBP 7,650,000 Sterling to launch, versus the GBP 24.1 million Sterling cost of the US Titan-Three-C booster. The German technicians who are now testing the rocket are unsentimental about being back into rocketry. It's pure business with them. They see their rocket as filling a need in industry, and a chance to make money. Nothing...




    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In West Germany, space scientists have been busy building cheap rockets in a project they describe as "creating a simple truck for space". They feel there is a need for such a rocket compared with what the United States has been building and what the Germans describe as "the Formula One Racing Car" type of rocket. N.B.C.'s John Dancy reports.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADHBC4AJF50GQ1DLQ9Z6K2N5JP
    Media URN:
    VLVADHBC4AJF50GQ1DLQ9Z6K2N5JP
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/01/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment