• Short Summary

    TRIPOLI, LIBYA/UNITED NATIONS/EGYPT/KHARTOUM, SUDAN

    Sudan has accused Libyan leader Muanmar Gaddafi of massing troops, armour and aircraft along its borders.

  • Description

    TRIPOLI, LIBYA: FEBRUARY 19:
    1. SV Libyan President Gaddafi speaking (SOT) 0.15
    2. GV Demonstrators with posters and banner chanting in streets and soldiers demonstrating (5 shots) 0.42
    3. GVs Demonstrators congregating at rally point (3 shots) 0.58
    UNITED NATIONS FEBRUARY 19:
    4. SV Libyan ambassador to U.N. Ali Treiki speaking (SOT) 2.17
    EGYPT (MUTE) RECENT:
    5. GV AWACS plane flying overhead and U.S. troops with Egyptian soldiers (5 shots) 2.47
    KHARTOUM, SUDAN (ENGLISH COMMENTARY) NOVEMBER 1981:
    6. gvs Troops training. Obstacle courses and target practice (8 shots) 3.23
    7. GV Khartoum market place. People buying and selling goods (6 shots) 3.46
    8. GVs & SVs Ugandan and Ethiopian refugees in camps (6 shots) 4.00
    TRANSCRIPTS:
    GADDAFI (SEQUENCE 1): "We are ready to fight until the last drop and to the last one of our people, men and women. We are not afraid at all. It will be a glorious battle if it takes place."
    TREIKI: (SEQUENCE 4): "Libya is a small country, with three millions. I don't think so that there is no one that can believe that. Libya is a small country with a threat to Egypt of 50 million and Sudan is 20 millions and why there is no what ever reason either concerning Egypt or concerning Sudan. You will be aware that for a few years now after Sadat, the Egyptians withdrew there military presence from the border as far as we.......were concerned we did the same. There is no mass troops between us and Egypt and between Libya and Sudan. We believe that the American administration would like to divert their attention of the public opinion towards their failure in the Middle East, in Lebanon and their interior problem -- mass unemployment and other, by creating a "scapegoat" and unfortunately Libya is the "scapegoat" for them."
    InitialsAL/BB

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THERE IS ENGLISH COMMENTARY BY NBC'S PAUL MILLER AVAILABLE FOR SEQUENCE SIX TO EIGHT WHICH MAY BE USED.
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: TRIPOLI, LIBYA/UNITED NATIONS/EGYPT/KHARTOUM, SUDAN

    Sudan has accused Libyan leader Muanmar Gaddafi of massing troops, armour and aircraft along its borders. But these charges have been denied by Libya. The Egyptian Defence Minister, Mohamed Abdel-Halim Abu Ghazala, has also insisted there was no sign of a crisis on the Sudan-Libyan border and brushed aside reports that United States surveillance planes had flown into Egypt at Cairo's request to monitor a threatened Libyan invasion. Field Marshal Abu Ghazala, however, said Egypt was ready to repel any aggression in accordance with its mutual defence pact with Sudan. The Sudanese accusation was made on February 18. Colonel Gaddafi said he wanted the United Nations Security Council to go to the Sudan-Libyan border area and see for themselves that there were no Libyan troops or Libyan bases. He added that if there was aggression Libya would be ready to fight until the last blow and the last man and woman. The Libyan leader accused the United States of threatening his country. At the same time hundreds of Libyans marched through Tripoli streets in an anti-U.S. demonstration. At the United Nations, the Libyan chief delegate, Ali Treiki, accused the U.S. of using its Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to create trouble between Sudan and Libya in a bid to involve U.S. forces in North Africa. He said the U.S. was using Libya as a "scapegoat" to divert attention from its failure in the Middle East. Mr. Treiki said there was no erasion for the U.S. to intervene in an Arab problem. U.S. officials claimed in early February that four AWACS radar planes had been sent to Egypt amid reports of the Libyan military build-up. The U.S. said sections of the Gulf were in international waters and it reserved the right to conduct military manoeuvres there. The Egyptian and Sudanese armies rely heavily on the U.S. for military aid. The U.S. provided 100 million U.S. dollars in military aid to Sudan in 1982. The Sudanese rapid deployment force has also been holding joint manoeuvres with U.S. troops. But Sudan's President Jaafar Nimeiri
    is worried that U.S. aid will be cut. Western diplomats in Khartoum believe the country's economic problems and internal subversion are greater threats than a Libyan invasion.

    Source: NBC/UNTV

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADJQJGXO592FNCSSF9LJLPZBY
    Media URN:
    VLVADJQJGXO592FNCSSF9LJLPZBY
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/02/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:04:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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