• Short Summary

    Recognizing that the increasing complexity of an automated society is demanding a greater degree of skill training from prospective employees, that many unskilled and semi-skilled jobs are disappearing, that a large number of young people fail to complete the regular four and five-year secondary school courses, that service industries provide expanding employment opportunities and that there is a need for extra pupil places, a decision was made by the Toronto Board of Education in 1960 to develop a new type of secondary school for those seeking as education leading to employment in service occupations.

  • Description

    1.
    MLS H/A - overall front view of school model (Castle Frank High School)


    2.
    MS Rear view of school model - including parking lot.


    3.
    MS Students entering main entrance.


    4.
    MS Horticulture teacher describing plants to students.


    5.
    LS Pan R-L with teacher checking work in greenhouse.


    6.
    MS Student placing plant in rockery.


    7.
    MCU Russian visitors (L to R - Mr. Igor Zabrodin, Sec. Gen. USSR-Canada Association Moscow; (not known); Mr. Wm. McLauchlin, Principal Castle Frank High; Mrs. Maximenka, Director of Education, Kiev; (not known); Mr. A. Maire, Pres. Soviet-Canadian Assoc. Cultural Exchange) - being shown ignition testing equipment by student.


    8.
    MS Students (3 Shot) Checking auto performance with cathode tube machine.


    9.
    MLS Automobile Instructor showing 4 students ignition system on display engine.


    10.
    MCU Same as #9.


    11.
    LS Service station classroom in progress.


    12.
    MCU Youth drawing spark plug on blackboard.


    13.
    MCU Youth checking notes.


    14.
    LS Masonry shop activity.


    15.
    MS Tilt up with student as he lifts cut stone to table under instructor's guidance.


    16.
    CU Instructor and student (head and shoulders)


    17.
    CU Instructor demonstrating stone cut using sledge and chisel.


    18.
    CU same as #15.


    19.
    CU Pan L-R as instructor hands over tools to student.


    20.
    CU ) Tilt up from roof model to woodwork instructor and MLS to) students working on pre-fab cottage.


    21.
    CU Student checking window frame level assisted by instructor as to procedure.


    22.
    MS L/A - Girl and boy wallpapering.


    23.
    MS Int. Decorating Instructor advising youth on upholstering technique.


    24.
    MS Student adjusts furnace flame as two others watch.


    25.
    CU Student looking on.


    26.
    MCU Blower cover removed.


    27.
    MS Tilt up from student working on not water furnace mechanism to second boy checking smoke density.


    28.
    CU Student tilting and reading smoke gauge.


    29.
    MLS Drycleaning shop - girl steam pressing in foreground.


    30.
    MS Girl operating shirt folding machine watched by instructor.


    31.
    MS ) Pan R-L from girls hairdressing mannequins to students gathering LS to) around table for instruction.


    32.
    MS Pan R-L from Students to Instructor demonstrating use of mannequin head.


    33.
    CU Tilt up from girl having hair done by boy student.


    34.
    CU Tilt down from girl to her hands pedicuring toes of another student.


    35.
    MS Girls under hairdriers.


    36.
    MLS Instructor conducting music class.


    37.
    MCU Two boys playing saxophones.


    38.
    CU Instructor conducting.


    39.
    MS 2 boys playing trumpet & trombone - others in background.


    40.
    MS Job counsellor advising two students.


    41.
    LS Pan R-L - with students entering school grounds.




    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Recognizing that the increasing complexity of an automated society is demanding a greater degree of skill training from prospective employees, that many unskilled and semi-skilled jobs are disappearing, that a large number of young people fail to complete the regular four and five-year secondary school courses, that service industries provide expanding employment opportunities and that there is a need for extra pupil places, a decision was made by the Toronto Board of Education in 1960 to develop a new type of secondary school for those seeking as education leading to employment in service occupations. The school was built under the terms of the Technical and Vocational Training Agreement with the Federal and Provincial Governments.

    The resulting school, Castle Frank High School, is located on the site of the summer home of the first Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada -- Colonel John Graves Simcoe, and is named after his only son Frank, who was killed in 1812 at the Battle of Badajoz. The nine acres of heavily treed parkland form the most beautiful landscape in the lower reaches of the Don River Valley. The school is completely sheltered from the heavy traffic on two sides, and blends into the residential areas on the other sides.

    Boys and girls of the City of Toronto who are recommended by their principals and who possess the necessary entrance qualifications may apply to enter Castle Frank High School -- they mast have successfully completed Grade 8 or meet the following three conditions -- have reached their 15th birthday, spent one full year in Grade 8, and in the opinion of their elementary school principal be likely to benefit more from instruction in Castle Frank High School than from a further year in elementary school.

    Boys and girls choosing the job-skill course are given training the first year in a minimum of seven shops selected from the courses available -- blue print reading; commercial art; food preparation and service; interior decorating; drapery and upholstering; horticulture; laundry and dry cleaning; machine shop and welding; masonry; merchandising and display; offset printing; oil heat service; photography; repairs to small motors; service station operation; screen processing; and wood-working. In the second year, the pupils specialize in a major shop and in addition take shops related to the major option. If a pupil decides to become a gasoline station operator, he would spend two periods each day in the school's full-size gasoline station but, as he will probably also be a retailer in such a job, he spends time in the courses related to his choice studying merchandising, bookkeeping, restaurant operation, possibly horticulture, and repairs of other types of motors. Graduates of the "job-skill" course receive a Castle Frank ???
    To provide a maximum of flexibility, courses are planned on the unit system -- which permits pupils in the same class to work at different levels and provides for those who require more time to complete an assignment.

    Assistance in the selection of a suitable course is offered through the Guidance and Placement Department, which also provides help to pupils in securing employment. Each pupil is assigned to a staff counsellor who takes particular interest from day to day in the progress and problems of the pupil.

    A general commercial course and a hair dressing course are, also, on the school's curriculum and all pupils take the academic programme including physical education, art or music.

    The driving force is the principal -- Mr. William McLauchlin, who at the request of the Toronto Board of Education spent several years touring the United States, Britain, Germany and the Scandinavian countries to study the latest ideas in vocational business education. On his return, he helped to design the school to meet the requirements of a school where the pupils could discover an outlet for their natural aptitudes and be channelled into jobs where their fundamental skills would prove rewarding. The pupils have average I.Q's and under the free-wheeling technique of the enthusiastic teachers who are devising their own textbooks in this pioneering project, the pupils are finding a practical approach to learning. Many of them considered themselves failures in the academically oriented school. Charlie Cook, who served his apprenticeship as a bricklayer in Glasgow, found that most of his pupils began by thinking that putting up a simple brick wall was easy but then they realized that it was a challenge. Some have a real flair for the craft and are keen to become foreman bricklayers.

    Educators from every province of Canada have visited Castle Frank High School to see the new approach to service training, and many educators from other countries are touring the school. At the time our crew were filming some of the classrooms, a Russian cultural delegation was touring the school, including the Director of Education in Kiev.

    Education in Canada is looked upon as a right, available to all children. It should be regarded as the chief domestic issue of the decade and its aim is to develop every pupil's ability to live usefully in society and to meet successfully the demands which society has a right to make upon them. The young person who drops out of school before obtaining the best education available to him finds that the status of all his adult life has been determined and fixed on a low level by his action. He is likely to be the first to lose his job in a slump. Studies show that he will probably move down the occupation ladder rather than up. His life will be unsatisfying, and he is unlikely to make a useful contribution to society.

    Castle Frank High School is a new type secondary school offering a programme of training for careers in the service industries - a secondary school providing a fourth choice for pupils beyond the public school level, and a secondary school designed to train young people for work which they may now enter without previous preparation. Already beauty salons, banks, department stores, etc., want to hire graduates from this school which opened in the Fall of 1963.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADNC8ER5WWO5WT1LDR671U25Z
    Media URN:
    VLVADNC8ER5WWO5WT1LDR671U25Z
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/01/1965
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:05:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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