• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Power needs in Yugoslavia have almost doubled every decade since the end of World War Two.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Drilling tower at Petisevci. PAN TO drilling tubes.
    0.11

    2.
    SV Drilling tower with hoist. (2 SHOTS)
    0.21

    3.
    SV Drilling tubes.
    0.27

    4.
    GV Hoist lowering tube.
    0.30

    5.
    CU Workmen adjusting drilling bits. (2 SHOTS)
    0.39

    6.
    SV Hoist lowering tube into ground and drilling. (5 SHOTS)
    1.03

    7.
    SV Hoist raising tubes from ground.
    1.12

    8.
    GV Buses and trucks use underpass. (2 SHOTS)
    1.27

    9.
    GV Cement factory at Trbovlje PAN TO storage tanks.
    1.35

    10.
    SV Oil tanks on railway lines.
    1.40

    11.
    GV Chimney at coal-fired power station. (2 SHOTS)
    1.47

    12.
    SV Pumping station and installations.
    1.51

    13.
    GV PAN Oil tanker railway trucks PAN TO oil storage tanks.
    2.08




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Power needs in Yugoslavia have almost doubled every decade since the end of World War Two. But crude oil production has been declining and the high cost of importing oil has proved prohibitive. Yugoslavia is now making great efforts to find new crude oil resources at home.

    SYNOPSIS: The village of Petisevci is in the extreme north east of Yugoslavia very near to the border with Hungary. So far small quantities of oil have been found 1500 metres beneath the surface and the Yugoslavs intend to dig deeper. Work goes on day and night.

    Major offshore exploration is taking place in the Adriatic Sea, but with mixed results. Yugoslavia now depends on imports for sixty per cent of its oil supply and the foreign currency it earns from tourism is nowhere near sufficient to meet its oil costs. It is spending three times more by importing oil than it earns in foreign currency. Thirty million dollars have been allocated for drilling new sites over the next five years, which will include the work at Petisevci. Experts have reservations about the chance of making significant finds, although recent oil and gas discoveries have been made in Eastern Yugoslavia.

    Towns have been especially hard hit. Petrol prices have risen 65 per cent over the last eighteen months. The government is concerned enough to speed up the exploitation of coal and nuclear resources.

    This cement works in Slovenia is a typical large oil-user. As the cost of oil stays high so the cost of the cement rises, giving another twist to the inflationary spiral.

    In the same town of Trbovlje the tallest chimney in Europe has been built to carry fumes and smoke away from a coal-fired power station.

    But oil is still the fuel which underpins the economy and Yugoslav leaders want a substantial increase in domestic production. This would strike at the root of inflation in the economy and allow the programme of industrialisation to go ahead uninterrupted.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADS8BJ055E2H1P4WR75BAKQ865
    Media URN:
    VLVADS8BJ055E2H1P4WR75BAKQ865
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/09/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:08:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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