• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Afghan resistance fighters have captured a Soviet tank in working condition.

  • Description

    1.
    SVs Afghan rebels sitting on top of Soviet tank driving along countryside (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    SV Tank continues over bumpy ground
    0.29

    3.
    SV Tank moving along
    0.42

    4.
    GV Soviet helicopters flying overhead
    0.54

    5.
    GV Shell-damaged village with rubble and smoke
    1.04

    6.
    SVs PAN Devastated village (2 shots)
    1.23

    7.
    TV Afghan rebels travelling along mountain trail
    1.31

    8.
    GV Rebels round knocked-out tank (3 shots)
    1.50

    9.
    GV ZOOM INTO SV Rebels stand on Russian tank (2 shots)
    2.12




    Initials PM



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Afghan resistance fighters have captured a Soviet tank in working condition. The guerrillas are also said to have taken Kalashnikov rifles, machine-guns and bazookas. Despite such gains the guerrillas still suffer heavy losses. Soviet and Afghan troops have destroyed a number of villages and the guerrillas reportedly are suffering food shortages.

    SYNOPSIS: The Afghan rebels are particularly short of heavy weaponry. Capturing tanks is rare, capturing tanks in working order is almost unheard of. So such an addition to their firepower lifts the morale of the guerrillas in spite of the odds against them. One rebel leader recently claimed his guerrillas were engaging troops from seven communist countries. Apart from Russians, Vietnamese and Cubans, rebel leader Mohammed Amin Wardak said there were also soldiers from east European countries in Afghanistan armed with the sophisticated weaponry of the Warsaw Pact.

    But it's helicopter gunships, more than tanks which prove the most destructive weapon in the Soviet arsenal. And the guerrillas have no arms against them. There is talk here of the United States supplying the guerrillas with heat-seeking land-to-air missiles. But until they arrive, if their sale is ever approved, devastated Mujahedin villages stand witness to the destructive power of the Soviet air attacks. One apparent Soviet tactic is to seek out villages, first pound them from the gunships and then call in artillery until the buildings are ruin and the population has fled.

    The guerrillas take sanctuary high in the mountains depending for their day-to-day supplies on food donated by sympathetic villagers. But the destruction of more and more villages and guerrilla strongholds has been an effort to break the rebels through lack of food. The rebels fight on with varying success. Often where they do capture a tank it is little more than a wreck.

    The guerrillas hold out hope for better and more sophisticated weapons from countries friendly to their cause. Rebel leader Mohammed Amin Wardak has named Egypt as the country giving the guerrillas the most significant aid. China, he explained is supplying light arms, but not enough to make the capture of a tank common place.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADZA10BKVADRUCBUFL1O9OSBB8
    Media URN:
    VLVADZA10BKVADRUCBUFL1O9OSBB8
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/03/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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