• Short Summary

    April 4 was Britain's Budget Day, and as Chancellor of the Exchequer Heathcoat Amory left the Treasury Building, London, on his way to make the Budget speech he held up the famous red dispatch box holding the secrets everyone was waiting impatiently to hear.

  • Description

    1.
    CV Treasury building, Parliament Square
    0.04

    2.
    GV crowd outside
    0.06

    3.
    SV ditto
    0.10

    4.
    LV Amory comes out of Treasury, holds up Budget case
    0.15

    5.
    SCU AND CU ditto
    0.22

    6.
    TOP V police hold back crowd
    0.27

    7.
    SV Amory walks to car and enters
    0.31

    8.
    GV Amory leaves for Parliament
    0.37

    9.
    CU Big Ben - time 3.10 pm
    0.40

    10.
    LV crowd outside Parliament
    0.43

    11.
    SV Prime Minister arrives
    0.46

    12.
    GV PAN Sir W. Churchill arrives WIPE
    0.54

    13.
    GV closed cinema
    0.59

    14.
    CU padlock and chain
    1.00

    15.
    CU debris and dirt
    1.04

    16.
    CU "sold" sign
    1.07

    17.
    SV cinema entrance
    1.10

    18.
    GV another cinema with "sold" sign
    1.13

    19.
    CU sign "closed to public"
    1.16

    20.
    SLV PAN "sold" sign DOWN front of cinema
    1.22

    21.
    CU torn cinema poster
    1.25

    22.
    GV PAN front of cinema TO "sold" sign
    1.29

    23.
    LV another closed cinema
    1.31

    24.
    CU notice giving reasons for closing (tax and running costs)
    1.37

    25.
    CU sign "taxed out of existence"
    1.39

    26.
    GV PAN FROM pavement to newspaper reader at cinema entrance
    1.43

    27.
    GV cinema converted for bowling
    1.46

    28.
    SV PAN above cinema
    1.50

    29.
    GV cinema still functioning
    1.54

    30.
    SV patrons at box office
    1.55

    31.
    CU tickets issued
    2.01

    32.
    SV patrons at box office
    2.05

    33.
    SV ditto
    2.08

    34.
    SV patrons up steps into auditorium
    2.19

    35.
    CU seat indicator with "full" sign on stalls sections
    2.22

    36.
    GV audience
    2.29

    37.
    SV empty seats
    2.34



    Initials BA/V/JF/BA



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: April 4 was Britain's Budget Day, and as Chancellor of the Exchequer Heathcoat Amory left the Treasury Building, London, on his way to make the Budget speech he held up the famous red dispatch box holding the secrets everyone was waiting impatiently to hear. Among the arrivals at Parliament were Premier Macmillan and Sir Winston Churchill.

    The Chancellor began his speech with a note of warning - that Britain must not spoil its prosperity by overloading the economy, and that the Exchequer had to beer the burden of the Transport Commission's GBP90 million deficit and of more pay for doctors and dentists.

    He then made his proposal - among them, a cut in the study on imported heavy wines, such as port, an increase in tobacco duty, and abolition of the cinema tax.

    Other measures included an increase of 2 1/2 percent to 12 1/2 percent in Profits Tax, encouragement for small savers in the form of Savings Certificates and Premium Bonds adjustments, and a proposal allowing for more post war credits to be paid out in hardship cases. There were also measures to check tax avoidance - no more losses in one trade to be set off against profits in another by the same person, a tax for "golden handshake" payment on termination of employment, and provision against tax avoidance in stock, share and security transactions.

    Opposition members cheered Mr. Amory as he finished, but Conservatives were more restrained. The Chancellor thought his Budget would have the right moderating influence on the rate of expansion of Britain's economy.

    Abolition of cinema tax - to cost GBP7 million in a full year - may have a big effect on Britain's cinemas, now badly hit by competition from television. The Chancellor's gift is not likely to be passed on to the public in the form of cheaper seats, however.

    Many of the cinemas have been forced to close, and movie-goers find many of their old haunts displaying "sold" or "taxed out of existence" notices. One cinema has solved the problem by turning itself into a bowling alley, and there were recently reports of a big scheme for turning Rank Organisation cinemas into office and shop premises.

    Thus, as Britain digested the detailed Budget proposals, and operators of cigarette machines - adjusted for sales at the old prices - grappled with a nightmare problem, one of the big questions was, would the cinemas now be able to get back on their feet again.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADZYFKRAR6XQ9Y8NBJ4KRNQVZM
    Media URN:
    VLVADZYFKRAR6XQ9Y8NBJ4KRNQVZM
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/04/1960
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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