• Short Summary

    Striking Bolivian transport drivers brought traffic to a standstill in the capital on Tuesday (10 June), amid growing fears of a military coup.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs La Paz Street with traffic jams caused by strike
    0.06

    2.
    CU Bus PULL OUT TO drivers on strike (2 shots)
    0.16

    3.
    SV PULL BACK TO GV Congestion in streets with people walking
    0.24

    4.
    SV Drivers in street and people arguing (2 shots)
    0.42

    5.
    GV PAN FROM Traffic TO police vehicles
    0.58

    6.
    GV PULL BACK Buses and trucks blocking roads
    1.04

    7.
    GV TILK DOWN Parliament building
    1.10

    8.
    GV & SV INTERIOR Parliamentary debate (4 shots)
    1.36




    Initials BB/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Striking Bolivian transport drivers brought traffic to a standstill in the capital on Tuesday (10 June), amid growing fears of a military coup. The Bolivian President, Lidia Gueiler, said she intended to go ahead with general elections set for June 29th, despite a military demand that they should be postponed for a year.

    SYNOPSIS: The drivers blocked streets in central La Paz with their vehicles to protest against recent bomb attacks on transport facilities. They were also complaining against alleged interference in Bolivia's internal affairs by the American Ambassador, Marvin Weissman.

    A newspaper reporter from the United States, Charles Krause, said he had been interrogated by the military about his reports that Ambassador Weissman had helped to prevent a military coup. Some sections of the army in the eastern Santa Cruz region demanded that Weissman should be ordered out of the country -- an declared that they were on a military alert when they failed to receive a reply from the government. On Wednesday (11 June) Bolivian politicians and trade unionists said they would resist any attempted coup by military officers. A grouping of political parties, clergymen, students and unions said it would organise a 'popular movement' to oppose physically any coup 'no mater where it comes from'.

    After a Congressional debate on the military's demands, President Gueiler announced that she intended to fulfil the mandate she had received from Parliament to lead Bolivia to 'free nd clean elections'. The military high command maintained that the winner of the elections would be weak and unable to solve the country's problems, and urged President Gueiler to form a government of national unity.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAE1BW5DY6RDP7BH32IGXM3Y2VH
    Media URN:
    VLVAE1BW5DY6RDP7BH32IGXM3Y2VH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/06/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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