• Short Summary

    VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

    A plague of mice is threatening country areas from western South Australia across Victoria and into northern New South Wales.

  • Description

    1. SV Blanket lifted up to reveal lots of mice, mice climbing posts. (3 SHOTS) 0.12
    2. GV & CU Mice inside agricultural machinery. (2 SHOTS) 0.21
    3. CU Mousetrap firm spokesman Michael Hill, speaking. (SOT) 0.42
    4. GV & SVs Millions of mice running everywhere, people jumping out of way, boy exhibits three captured specimens. (3 SHOTS) 0.54
    5. SVs Mousetraps coming off conveyors belts. (4 SHOTS) 1.12
    6. SV More mice swarming over beams. (2 SHOTS) 1.21
    TRANSCRIPTS:
    HILL: (SEQ 3) "The demand at this point in time would be in excess of any thing we've ever experienced before."
    REPORTER: "And why is that?"
    HILL: "Basically what we are experiencing at this point in time is a mouse plague, and throughout Victoria it's not looking like decreasing at any point in time in the near future, and in fact it's probably going to get worse."
    InitialsCG/JRS

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS COMMENTARY BY AN ATV 10, REPORTER, WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED.
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

    A plague of mice is threatening country areas from western South Australia across Victoria and into northern New South Wales. The plague of mice, normally associated with the breaking of a sever drought, is a phenomenon which has often ravaged parts of Australia. Usually a severe bout of weather, either heavy rain or a sharp frost, controls the swarms of rodents. So far, the weather has been mild and farming communities are resorting to poison and traps in a bid to stem the overwhelming tide. The plague is good business for those who sell the poisons and traps, but the mice are breeding faster than the traps can catch them. Bremadiolone, a fairly new anticoagulent, is the only poison registered by the Department of Agriculture for the baiting of farm perimeters and around buildings. Australia's great rabbit plague was halted by the man-made disease Myxamatosis but it is rare to find a virus that will stick to one species. While research continued everyone is praying for heavy frosts to rid their homes from the furry invaders.

    Source: ATV 10, AUSTRALIA

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAE773MBG7H1SZBEZR2NVX2YJDS
    Media URN:
    VLVAE773MBG7H1SZBEZR2NVX2YJDS
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/06/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:22:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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