• Short Summary

    Thirty-two thousand
    feet above sea level, in the wooded uplands of the country's interior, lies
    Tegucigalpa, capital of Honduras since 1880.

  • Description

    1.
    TGV Tegucigalpa
    0.05

    2.
    TRAVEL SHOT.. boys ride trolley on highway into city.
    0.11

    3.
    LV City centre policeman directs traffic.
    0.15

    4.
    CU Policeman.
    0.19

    5.
    SV Traffic and laden donkeys along street.
    0.27

    6.
    CU TO SV PAN.. newspaper vendor pan to privately owned Volkswagen buses
    pulling into kerb.
    0.35

    7.
    SV Passengers alight.
    0.39

    8.
    STV Children and adults carry flowers in
    funeral cortage.
    0.48

    9.
    SV PAN.. mourners and coffin
    carried on stretcher
    0.58

    10.
    ANGLE V.. onlookers.
    1.03

    11.
    SCU Member of National Guard.
    1.07

    12.
    SV Sign over Cuban Information Office.
    1.10

    13.
    SV People look in window of Information Office.
    1.14

    14.
    SCU Castro posters in window (Communists daubed in
    paint).
    1.16

    15.
    LV PAN.. two girls along street.
    1.21

    16.
    LV Magazine sellers.
    1.25

    17.
    CU Magazine on stand.
    1.28

    18.
    GV Main
    square and cathedral.
    1.32

    19.
    ANGLE V.. Statue of
    Francisco Morasan, Honduran patriot.
    1.34

    20.
    TV
    People seated around main square.
    1.37

    21.
    SV Shoe
    shine boy at work.
    1.41

    22.
    GV Stallholders sell
    wares at side of cathedral.
    1.44

    23.
    SV PAN.. shoe
    repairer carries on trade in open.
    1.48

    24.
    SV Sugar
    cane being trimmed on stall.
    1.52

    25.
    SCU Ditto.
    1.57

    26.
    CU Small boy eating sugar cane
    2.00

    27.
    STV Icecream vendor cutting ice shavings.
    2.05

    28.
    SCU PAN.. ditto, places shavings in cone, adds flavouring.
    2.15

    29.
    SV PAN.. boys walk along eating icecream.
    2.20

    30.
    GV PAN.. River Rio Grande pan to
    Presidential Palace.
    2.28

    31.
    LV Presidential Palace.
    2.31

    32.
    SV PAN.. armed guard on palace battlements.
    2.36

    33.
    GV Palace gardens.
    2.39

    34.
    LV President Ramon Morales at work at office.
    2.43

    35.
    CU President Morales.
    2.51

    36.
    LV PAN.. Presidential Palace pan to Central Bank.
    2.57

    37.
    LV Traffic past Chamber of Deputies.
    3.01



    Initials TDH/V/PB WS/PB



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Thirty-two thousand
    feet above sea level, in the wooded uplands of the country's interior, lies
    Tegucigalpa, capital of Honduras since 1880. Because it is without a railway,
    Tegucigalpa can only be reached by road or by air.

    Like most cities in Honduras, Tegucigalpa is not overcrowded. Its population
    numbers only 106,949. Mainly an agricultural country, the people of Honduras
    prefer to live in farming communities spread throughout the nation's total area
    of 43,278 square miles. Much of it fertile valleys and wooded tablelands.

    With a long history of military dictatorships and political instability, it is
    perhaps not surprising that some Hondurans are sympathetic towards Cuba's Castro
    regime. A Cuban Information Centre in Tegucigalpa openly displays pro-Castro
    literature, despite official displeasure at such activities.

    One of the most imposing buildings in Tegucigalpa is the fortress-like
    Presidential Palace alongside the Rio Grande Geuluteca. While armed guards
    patrol the battlements, President Dr. Jose Ramon Villeda Morales-installed as
    head of a democratically elected administration on Dec. 21, 1958-works
    unconcernedly in one of the cool, stone floored offices.

    Honduras is bounded on the north by the Caribbean sea, and the east by
    Nicaragua, on the south by Nicaragua, the Pacific Ocean and El Salvador, and on
    the west by Guatemala. Its main exports are bananas and coffee, of which the
    United States takes more than sixty-per-cent. The USA also supplies more than
    the sixty-per-cent of imported goods.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEALSCBHY6FR1GAI0L8IQRPNK4
    Media URN:
    VLVAEALSCBHY6FR1GAI0L8IQRPNK4
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/02/1961
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:03:02:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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