• Short Summary

    In Poland, more and more cities are affected by spreading strikes.

  • Description

    1.
    CU & PULL BACK Sign over Gdansk shipyard entrance in Poland.
    0.05

    2.
    GV PAN Polish strikers in yard. Strikers greeting strike leader on back of vehicle. (3 SHOTS)
    0.24

    3.
    CU Strike leader with microphone.
    0.46

    4.
    GV Polish President in exile, Count Edward Raczynski being assisted in offices in London.
    0.53

    5.
    GV Speaker supporting Polish Government-in-exile applauded.
    0.57

    6.
    SCU Count Raczynski.
    1.01

    7.
    SCU Speaker (in Polish) at meeting with audience listening. (2 SHOTS)
    1.14

    8.
    CU TILT Flag TO entrance of Polish Government-in-exile offices.
    1.20

    9.
    CU Heraldic eagle symbol on wall.
    1.23

    10.
    SV Prime Minister in exile and adviser talking in Polish. (3 SHOTS)
    1.47

    11.
    SV Polish Prime Minister in exile, Mr. Kasimir Sabbat speaking in English.
    2.11


    SABBAT: "I don't think the question of this government taking over in Poland really matters at this stage. Certainly, what's going on in Poland brings nearer the day of independence for Poland."





    Initials JS/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In Poland, more and more cities are affected by spreading strikes. Close to the Silesian coal-mining region, workers said they had brought 20 enterprises to a halt, while in Poland's second largest city, Lodz, officials said 10 firms were affected. Strikers there presented the same demands as workers in Gdansk, where the labour dispute started more than two months ago.

    SYNOPSIS: At the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk, negotiations between the strikers and the government were slow off the ground. The chief government negotiator Deputy Prime Minister Miecyslaw Jagielski, returned from Warsaw on Wednesday (27 August) to continue discussions on the strikers' main political demand: the right to independent union representation. Prime Minister Edward Gierek has pledged secret elections tot he present government-sponsored trade unions, but the strikers rejected Mr. Gierek's concession as insufficient. They want a union system totally separate to the Police state structure. This has proved a major stumbling block in negotiations. The strikers already have won economic concessions, and say they will persist in their political demands.

    One man has supported the strikers all along. He is Count Edward Raczynski the Polish President-in-exile. He and his supporters have regular meetings in London and claim to be the heirs of Poland's administration before the German invasion in 1939. Members of London's Polish Government-in-exile realise that there is little more than verbal support they can offer the strikers. But any sense of frustration at their forced inactivity is surpassed by an air of urgency in their conviction to keep other Polish exiles informed of developments.

    To that end Prime Minister-in-exile Kasimir Sabbat and his adviser study the latest communiques. They are surrounded by relics of a pre-communist past. Prime Minister Sabbat is certain that era will return to Poland, but he thinks it unlikely he'll return to Warsaw to claim office.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAECRV38GUQJ0FNIZ0150HBDJT2
    Media URN:
    VLVAECRV38GUQJ0FNIZ0150HBDJT2
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/08/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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