• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The leader of South Africa's five million Zulus, Chief Gatsha Buthelezi, has condemned the South African rain on the African National Congress (ANC) headquarters in Maputo.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Large crowds at rally. (2 SHOTS)
    0.14

    2.
    SV Men holding shield and spears walk down steps.
    0.22

    3.
    CU PULL BACK TO SV Wreath and banner on wall reading "Black Unity and Solidarity is the answer to our Liberation" PULL BACK TO Officials at table.
    0.34

    4.
    SCU Buthelezi speaking in Zulu as crowds listen. (2 SHOTS)
    0.48

    5.
    SCU Buthelezi speaking and crowd cheers.
    1.04

    6.
    GV Crowds standing listening to speech.
    1.10

    7.
    CU Buthelezi speaking.
    1.25

    8.
    GV ZOOM INTO SV EXTERIOR OF Stadium and car with poster on door reading "Buy Your Sowetan Feb 2 Daily"
    1.38

    9.
    SV PULL BACK TO GV Poster on wall reading "Back oppression knows no ethnic boundaries - United and overcome" PULL BACK TO main entrance with people walking through gate.
    1.49




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The leader of South Africa's five million Zulus, Chief Gatsha Buthelezi, has condemned the South African rain on the African National Congress (ANC) headquarters in Maputo. Fourteen people were killed on Friday (30 January) during the commando raid on three houses in the Mozambique capital. They include 11 occupants of the ANC houses, two South African soldiers and a Portuguese civilian. Chief Buthelezi told a mass rally on Sunday (1 February) these actions could only drive more South African blacks into violent opposition to the government.

    SYNOPSIS: Fifteen-thousand of his supporters crowded the Jabulani Stadium in Soweto to protest against the raid, the first of its kind against a target in Mozambique. Chief Buthelezi is the Chief Minister of Kwazulu, the traditional Zulu homeland. He's also president of the Inkatha movement, the largest black organisation in South Africa. The Zulu leader, aged 52, is an outspoken critic of the country's apartheid policies. But many of South Africa's black majority consider his attitude to the government to be too moderate.

    Chief Buthelezi said the attack on the ANC installations was a tragedy which created intense hatred, hardened feelings and made reconciliation between black and white more and more impossible.

    South Africa's Defence Minister, General Magnus Malan, said on Sunday (1 February) that government forces would strike again if necessary against countries which harbour black nationalist guerrillas.

    Poster outside the stadium advertised the Sowetan, a new black-edited daily newspaper which was published for the first time the next day (2 February). The paper hopes to fill a vacuum created by the recent banning of the Post, a publication aimed at black readers. The Sowetan's first edition led with a report on Chief Buthelezi's mass meeting in Soweto.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEJY3DDBXPMV6HMC3OEAGC1Q14
    Media URN:
    VLVAEJY3DDBXPMV6HMC3OEAGC1Q14
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/02/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:49:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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