• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The London-based Financial Times newspaper has begun a two-week trial of high-speed facsimile transmission by satellite to its West German printing works.Normally copy for the international edition is sent via a costly 24-hour open telephone line.The first transmission, carried out late last month (November) proved an outstanding success.

  • Description

    LONDON, UK AND FRANKFURT, WEST GERMANY 3 DECEMBER, 1981 ( REUTERS - RORY MCLEOD AND GUENTER LAHMANN)



    GV Financial times building, London.
    CUs Braken House logo and Financial Times sign. (2 SHOTS)
    SV Financial times share index display in window.
    INTERIOR

    SCUs Financial Times sheets in transmitting equipment. (3 SHOTS)
    CU Start button pushed and machine revolving. (2 SHOTS)
    CU Scanner at work.
    EXTERIOR

    CU & SV Transmitting dish on top of Braken House. (3 SHOTS)
    GV Receiving dish at Frankfurt publishing house.
    SV & CU Film processor. (2 SHOTS)
    CU & SV Developed negative removed from machined and checked by operator. (2 SHOTS)
    SVs Operators making plate from negative. (3 SHOTS)
    SVs Operator setting up rotation print. (2 SHOTS)
    CU Printed copy of Financial Times.

    (2.11)
    JS

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The London-based Financial Times newspaper has begun a two-week trial of high-speed facsimile transmission by satellite to its West German printing works.Normally copy for the international edition is sent via a costly 24-hour open telephone line.The first transmission, carried out late last month (November) proved an outstanding success.

    SYNOPSIS: The Financial Times is regarded as the bible of the business world.the paper concentrates on company news and the monetary climate.

    Because of the fast-changing situation on the world markets, speed is essential and the satellite transmission gives the publisher a much quicker feed of copy to the international edition.The pages are set in London, and at the push of a button are relayed to the satellite which beams them into Frankfurt taking less than an hour of satellite time to send the complete edition.The tests were also designed to provide experience in the preparation of a Europe-wide satellite communications service which will be on offer to business users from 1984.

    These dish aerials send and receive the signals between London and Frankfurt.Although a strange sight on top of a newspaper building, they may well predict the future of the print industry.

    The next step is conversion of the messages in a film processor.From there the developed negative is carefully checked for any print errors.

    Once the negative has been proved correct, a printing plate is made.Other operators have made ready the presses for the production run.All that is needed now is for the plates to be set in place and printing can begin.The trial has been carried out in conjunction with British Telecom and the West German Post Office, It is the first time a British newspaper has been linked by satellite to a production facility in another European Common Market country.The Financial Times says it will consider using the European Space Agency's satellite regularly in the future -- if it proves economically attractive.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAESKAETJFJU54ZSE6F8531UFEF
    Media URN:
    VLVAESKAETJFJU54ZSE6F8531UFEF
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/12/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:11:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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