• Short Summary

    World criticism of South Africa's apartheid policies is increasing sharply and this week the Prime Minister, John Vorster, is meeting United States Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, for talks which will probably include discussion of the situation.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN: South African embassy in Bonn PAN TO security police guarding building (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    SV PAN DOWN TV aerial to television van outside embassy
    0.18

    3.
    CU: Policeman with rifle PAN TO another policeman in van monitoring screen
    0.24

    4.
    GV: demonstrators with banners outside embassy (2 shots)
    0.42

    5.
    LV: Car driving embassy through crowd of security guards and newsmen
    0.46

    6.
    LV and SV: Ambassador walking to embassy for talks
    1.02

    7.
    CU: Mrs. Mandela speaking in English
    1.42

    8.
    SV: Black South Africa ministers leaving building after talks with Botha (2 shots)
    2.03

    9.
    SV: white ministers leave
    2.06

    10.
    SV: Botha (nearest cameras) with other ministers, down steps into car and away (4 shots)
    2.26


    REPORTER: "You say that you (indistinct) for the black people in Prime Minister Vorster's trip to Europe to see Doctor Kissinger, the U.S. Secretary of State".



    MANDELA: "It is absolutely laughable to us. It is of no significance whatever to the black man in this country. It's just as much as his visit to some of these black states are of no consequence whatsoever to the black man's cause. There's no relevance".



    REPORTER: "So you don't have a very high regard of the Prime Minister's detente policy".



    MANDELA: "Absolutely nothing. Nor have I any respect for Kissinger's role at the moment in the black cause in this country".



    The death toll from township violence reached 140 on Tuesday (22 June), with 1,128 injured. All but ten of those were killed in last week's Soweto riots and 10 more Africans died on Monday in renewed outbreaks of rioting and looting.




    Initials RH/DE/AU/2330



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: World criticism of South Africa's apartheid policies is increasing sharply and this week the Prime Minister, John Vorster, is meeting United States Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, for talks which will probably include discussion of the situation. But leading black nationalist leader, Mrs. Winnie Mandela, has said the talks will do little for the black people in South Africa. Black leaders met government officials during the weekend to try and work out a solution to the problems which caused the rioting in Soweto last week.

    SYNOPSIS: The prelude to Mr. Vorster's meeting was a conference of 20 South African ambassadors in the West German capital of Bonn on Monday. The two days of talks were expected to be dominated by the growing world criticism, although some diplomats say the violence could have been deliberately provoked to embarrass Mr. Vorster. The ambassadors came from Europe, North America and the Middle East.

    On Monday about a hundred young people gathered outside the South African embassy protesting against apartheid. The meeting was originally scheduled for the embassy but was later held in the envoy's residence because of the demonstration.

    Opposition has come from inside South Africa about Mr. Vorster's talks with Dr. Kissinger. Black nationalist leader, Winnie Mandela, says the talks have no significance. She said the United States would be of no help.

    Mean Wile, on Saturday, black leaders met with government officials to try and work out a solution to the current race-and-language conflict. This was what caused last week's riots in Soweto. The meeting decided that the policy of requiring African schools to continue teaching some subjects in Afrikaans would remain. But schools will be entitled to apply for exemption and it's thought this will be granted almost automatically now. The meeting agreed to a joint announcement which said the "tragic occurrences in Soweto were caused by misunderstanding and confusion".

    The meeting was chaired by the Minister of Bantu education, Mr. Michiel Botha. He's seen here closest to the camera. Many commentators in South Africa say Mr. Botha is in danger of losing his portfolio. There have also been calls for the resignation of his second in command who implemented the language policy.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAFGNZ19B8VYCURR2IARYI19XO
    Media URN:
    VLVAFGNZ19B8VYCURR2IARYI19XO
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/06/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:26:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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