• Short Summary

    In South Africa, the last residents of one Cape Town's best-known Coloured communities were evicted from their homes on June 19.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs Cape Town's District Six. (2 SHOTS)
    0.07

    2.
    GVs & SVs People loading goods into vans. (10 SHOTS)
    0.55

    3.
    SV Selwyn Rogers speaking to newsman.
    1.42

    4.
    GVs Houses being prepared for Whites. (4 SHOTS)
    2.00


    TRANSCRIPT: ROGERS: (SEQ 4) "I feel bad because this is the place I was born in, and grew up in, and now I have to leave it."



    GAVSHON: "How do you feel about Whites moving in to your home?"



    ROGERS: "I feel bad because, all the time, the Coloured have stayed here. They were born here, they lived here, and now because it's near the city the Whites have to take over. It's wrong."



    GAVSHON: "How far away are you going to be living from the city?"



    ROGERS: "Quite far, about ten miles. That means there is a distance to travel."



    GAVSHON: "Do you think the government is changing at all in relation to the Coloured people?"



    ROGERS: "No, I don't see a change, because if there were a change, they would let the Coloured people stay, and not make room for the Whites. They give the Whites their rights, now they just ignore the Coloureds."





    Initials





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In South Africa, the last residents of one Cape Town's best-known Coloured communities were evicted from their homes on June 19. About 40,000 people have now left Cape Town's District Six, once a thriving, bustling, inner city suburb of Coloured (mixed race) and Asian people. Their homes will be taken over by Whites. Stringent new laws prohibit people of different races from living in the same neighbourhood, and from now on, Whites only will be living here. For those who are leaving, sadness was tinged with bitterness. One resident, Selwyn Rogers, told Visnews' Mike Gavshon he had lived all his life in District Six, and leaving would be a major disruption. Nor will these people be able to join their former neighbours. They have been classified as Indians, so they will be unable to join the Coloureds in their new settlements. In fact, these people are Moslems. Their old homes are being offered to Whites at between 31 thousand and 52 thousand rand (34 thousand and 57 thousand dollars) with 90 per cent government bonds and subsidised interest rates.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAM9E70AI2VAZ1S4OZ7Y09NNT5
    Media URN:
    VLVAM9E70AI2VAZ1S4OZ7Y09NNT5
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/06/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment