• Short Summary

    For two years, Miss Eiko Kuwabara has reigned as Japan's national women's kendo champion - topping generation of youth who have revived the ancient art of Japanese fencing.

  • Description

    1.
    Eido Kuwabara walking towards camera (2 shots)
    9 ft

    2.
    Exterior Kokushikan University
    12 ft

    3.
    CU University sign
    13 1/2 ft

    4.
    Students clean floor (2 shots)
    23 ft

    5.
    Men exercise PAN to Miss Kuwabara
    31 ft

    6.
    CU Miss Kuwabara
    33 ft

    7.
    Men practise
    35 1/2 ft

    8.
    MS Miss Kuwabara
    38 1/2 ft

    9.
    Men seated
    41 ft

    10.
    Men seated PAN to Miss Kuwabara
    47 ft

    11.
    Cutaway
    49 ft

    12.
    Miss Kuwabara puts on faceguard
    57 ft

    13.
    Miss Kuwabara stands up
    60 ft

    14.
    CU Miss Kuwabara
    61 1/2 ft

    15.
    MS Miss Kuwabara & partner practise (2 shots)
    72 ft

    16.
    WS women practise (2 shots)
    82 ft



    Initials rgh-ht/vs/ac


    SPORT: FENCING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: For two years, Miss Eiko Kuwabara has reigned as Japan's national women's kendo champion - topping generation of youth who have revived the ancient art of Japanese fencing. Aged 20 and a student at Kokushikan University in Tokyo, Miss Kuwabara has shouldered her kendo sword every day for the past ten years.

    The revival in the sport has boosted membership of the university's kendo club to more than 500. Miss Kuwabara is one of the keenest, turning out for practice daily for two and a half hours - at 5.30 in the morning and again in the afternoon.

    Kendo primarily is a man's sport but more and more Japanese girls are taking it up for posture improvement. When Eiko Kuwabara first began kendo while at primary school in Japan's southern island of Kyushu, she was the only girl in the local club. Now she's one of thirty women members at the university club.

    Kendo translated means "fencing art". It developed rapidly in the 12th century with the rise of the military class and the simultaneous refinement in the art of making swords. Every "samurai" (swordsman) looked on his weapon as the embodiment of his spirit.

    With the introduction of modern military weapons, kendo was almost forgotten in Japan. However, in recent years it has been revived both as a gymnastic exercise and an aid to mental discipline.

    In Kendo bouts, each contestant wears a face-guard, a plastron to cover the chest and gauntlets to protect the hands and arms. The four-foot long swords are made of bamboo.

    In an attack, each competitor arms at the opponent's face (front) or side), the side of the chest or a thrust to the throat. Hit in any of these places, a contestant concedes defeat. A match goes to the winner of the best of three bouts.

    In kendo, however, mere skill in hitting an antagonist accurately is not prized so much as are displays of coolness and self-control. And this is what attracted Eiko Kuwabara to the sport.

    With two national kendo victories and several minor titles to her credit, Miss Kuwabara is without doubt Japan's top woman exponent of the sport. And with long hours of daily practice, she's confident of retaining her lead.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAQ8Y4JSEY28BD4AL0NYM7G01H
    Media URN:
    VLVAQ8Y4JSEY28BD4AL0NYM7G01H
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/03/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:10:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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