• Short Summary

    Sikorsky sky crane--the 'jumbo jet' of helicopters--on Saturday (8 March) began dismantling construction equipment atop what will soon be the world's tallest man-made, self-supporting structure-the Canadian National Railways Tower in Toronto.

  • Description

    1.
    GV TILT UP Communications tower TO helicopter above lifting crane (MUTE) (5 shots)
    0.27

    2.
    GROUND TO AIR Helicopter with part of crane as photographers look on (SOUND STARTS) (4 shots)
    0.48

    3.
    SV GROUND TO AIR Helicopter with crane section (2 shots)
    1.02

    4.
    LV Communications tower
    1.09

    5.
    GV PAN FROM Helicopter TO communications tower (SOUND ENDS)
    1.18


    TRANSCRIPT: "The first section to be lifted was a one-hundred-foot, eight-ton jib boom--a relatively easy task for the giant helicopter that can carry more than twenty-two-thousand pounds. It was a cold, clear day-- ideal for photographers and sidewalk superintendents. When the crane is dismantled, the helicopter will start erecting a three-hundred-and-thirty-five-foot antenna that--beginning next year-- will transmit the signals from Toronto's television and FM radio stations. The operation is expected to take more than a month, at a cost of sixty-five-hundred dollars a day. Although winds at the top of the tower were gusting to nearly forty miles an hour, the pilot of the helicopter called the job routine. Addition of the antenna will pull the tower to eighteen-hundred feet--making it the world's tallest free-standing structure. Larry Stout, CBC News."




    Initials BB/1606 PS/DW/BB/1620


    TELERECORDING
    This film is serviced with a commentary by CBC reporter Larry Stout, which is for use.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Sikorsky sky crane--the 'jumbo jet' of helicopters--on Saturday (8 March) began dismantling construction equipment atop what will soon be the world's tallest man-made, self-supporting structure-the Canadian National Railways Tower in Toronto.

    When the task of removing a 47 1/2-ton construction crane from the present, 1,500-foot (457 metre) top of the telecommunications tower is completed, the same giant helicopter will begin erecting a 335-foot (102-metre) needle-shaped broadcasting antenna. The addition of the antenna--which is expected to take a month--will raise the finished tower to 1,835 feet (559 metres), making it the world's tallest free-tele-communications tower completed in 1967 at Ostankino in Greater Moscow--rises to 1,749 feet (533 metres).

    The Toronto tower, overlooking Lake Ontario, was begun in February, 1973, as the start of a 190-acre (77-hectare) lake front redevelopment scheme aimed at giving the Ontario capital a new commercial core, combining office and apartment towers, over the next 15 years.

    Owned and built by the Canadian National Railways as its central communications and weather station, the tower will also serve the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with six television transmitters and five FM-radio transmitters.

    It is also expected to be a major tourist attraction. From the tower's three observation decks and a revolving dining room at the 1,100-foot (335-metre) level, Niagara Falls is clearly visible 70 miles (112 kilometres) across Lake Ontario.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAVCG7KABAPTVO8K9SDEHWJF5A
    Media URN:
    VLVAVCG7KABAPTVO8K9SDEHWJF5A
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/03/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:45:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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